Berberian Sound Studio by Peter Strickland

Berberian Sound Studio by Peter Strickland

 

Berberian Sound Studio centers on Gilderoy (played by Toby Jones), a British foley artist working on the audio track for an Italian giallo film, The Equestrian Vortex, takes a wrong turn as life starts to imitate art.

Berberian Sound Studio
subverts the usual visual experience of watching a horror film and shows you the creation of a horror film in sequences where you see the foley effects, voice and music being added to a film that is omitted from the audience. It creates an unsettling otherworldly creepiness as you watch foley artists stab watermelons, voice actresses shrieking and convulsing in sync to an offscreen projection. We never see much of the film-within-a-film The Equestrian Vortex and the lack of it forces the audience to be highly sensitive to the the sounds in the film. It’s unnerving and it becomes gradually creepier as it goes along. Never has a shot of someone’s hand tearing lettuce been so scary.

As a “film about a film”, Berberian Sound Studio celebrates the art of filmmaking by showing us the power of cinema by presenting all its techniques both literally and metaphorically. It’s not heavy on plot nor character. You must feel your way throughout this film with your senses as it’s creating tensions through visuals, sounds and feelings.

Things that aren’t happening before us are constantly implied and its constant claustrophobic interior setting is a metaphor about the inward journey of the artist’s mind creating their own world. The way an artist craft stories with their imaginations, the love and stress that goes into their work and how it can often become obsessive.

And for that, it’s perfectly okay to be lost inside Berberian Sound Studio. Set the volume at a decent level and just let the visuals, soundscape and montage guide you through varying states of reality and fantasy. I recommend it to horror fans and any film buff. It’s a real piece of art.

We Need To Talk About Kevin by Lynne Ramsay

We Need To Talk About Kevin by Lynne Ramsay

There are three Louis C.K. jokes about how parenting is the hardest job in the world, it is the only job you cannot quit and yet parents are never allowed to say it is hard in front of people. That idea taken to an extreme is the premise of We Need To Talk About Kevin.

What is that extreme? It is the worst child imaginable. The kid Kevin (played by Ezra Miller) in this movie is an evil cunt (excuse my French, but if you see this movie, you will understand) whose sole purpose is to hurt people without purpose. Why does he hurt people? He doesn’t even know, he just enjoys it with zero empathy. I hope Ezra Miller can get a date after the film’s release. Yes, it’s that kind of performance.

It’s funny how stories can take you places and make you feel things that would never be okay in real life. I remember watching Vicky Cristina Barcelona and remember rooting for Javier Bardem, Scarlett Johannson and Penelope Cruz’s odd threesome relationship because it made them all happy. I laughed, going “Damn you, Woody Allen for making me feel like this.” That’s what makes watching movies fun. And here’s the thing with this film: I wanted Kevin to die. I was thinking up horrible ways for him to die throughout the entire movie. The worst scenario I was wishing was Kevin’s mother Eva (played by Tilda Swinton) to curb stomp him and get it over with. We Need To Talk About Kevin took me to an unique place, an uncomfortable place sure, but somewhere I have never quite been – wanting a little child to die so her mom can be free of him.

Speaking of the mother, the story completely hangs on Tilda Swinton’s performance. Completely. There are scenes where the viewer is fully omitted from what she’s looking at, but we’re only allowed to interpret what it is through her facial reactions. She constantly plays two opposing emotions against each other. Her character Eva feels remorse for bringing this little motherfucker into existence but out of her duty as a mother she must stick by him. The ultimate tragedy is that Kevin came out of her womb. As a mother she is symbiotically connected to him (and the film underplays that as part of it’s unnerving tension) and therefore responsible for his actions, even though she completely probably wishes she never had him to begin with.

The soundscape in this film is very noteworthy. It represents Eva’s emotional state from her first person perspective. Much of the score is these dark tones, which helps physicalize experience Eva’s inner unexplainable turmoil. Throughout the film Kevin has a habit of doing little things with his hands that are unnerving: he’s mashing breakfast cereal into pieces, snapping Crayons in half, throwing jam/paint all over the place, rolling bread rolls into little balls as if he’s constantly picking at his mother’s patience. Contrastingly, Eva hands are constantly cleaning, wiping, scrapping, as if she’s trying to wipe the imprint of her son away. All these little sounds helps you experience what it’s like being right up close to Kevin and how anarchic and annoying he is. We experience her personal first-person version of hell and it’s an unnerving experience.

There’s a running motif with the colour red, it follows with Eva in her younger pre-Kevin years and eventually the color red appears along with Kevin. It’s meaning develops into different things as the story progresses along. It physicalized the symbiotic relationship between the mother and the son. It represented other things too, but I won’t go into it any further. Yes, spot the colour red!

Lynne Ramsay understands faces and how it can evoke a feeling like a landscape (Seriously, Google Ezra Miller’s face or look at his face above). I like this trait in a director. I can’t explain it.

This was very well done. There’s a lot of craft to telling a great story. I can’t recommend it more! Damn, I’m going to have to come up with a Top Ten List for 2011.

P.S. A reason to watch the end credits. This movie has a “Computer Virus Maker”.