A Dangerous Method by David Cronenberg

A Dangerous Method

A Dangerous Method (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

There is something very cinematic about watching the creation of something. In A Dangerous Method, we see the beginnings of psychoanalysis and the intellectual debate about the approach to the mind. Carl Jung (played by Michael Fassbender) treats Sabina Spielrein (played by Kiera Knightley), whom eventually becomes his assistant and one of the first female psychoanalysts. They begin a love affair, that breaks the boundaries of their doctor-patient relationship and threatens Jung’s family and career. Adding oil to the fire is the presence of Sigmund Freud (played by Viggo Mortensen), of whom Jung seeks approval from but ultimately their relationship turns turbulent as they differ on views of sexuality and religion.

First of all, I liked the 2 lead performances. Michael Fassbender is great as Carl Jung. Viggo Mortensen brings true gravitas to Sigmund Freud, and we experience how Carl Jung is intimidated by his presence. Viggo is our generation’s Robert De Niro. He’s come a long way as an Omish dude sitting at the back of a carriage in Witness. Some actors are good at creating a character internally (i.e. Robert De Niro is always Robert De Niro but is able to create a character)and some actors are good at physicalizing a character (i.e. Johnny Depp as Jack Sparrow or Willy Wonka). Viggo Mortensen is both. Any role Viggo is in, he truly transforms into his roles inside-out and always creates a presence to be marveled.

On the issue of Kiera Knightley convulsing and making spastic movements… given that it is a factually-accurate portrayal of mental distress, she’s performing the psychosis as if she were in a theatrical play. She has yet to learn how to use a close-up on film. In my opinion, it’s not her fault. The director should have cut around her or toned her actions down. Watching her face as she does them, it feels very performed. I think less is more in this case and this was somewhat of a miscalculation on Cronenberg’s part. However, Knightley does fares better in the latter half of the movie.

I can see why David Cronenberg was attracted to do this material. There is a mental violence underneath the relationships between Freud, Jung and Spielrein. At times it is about manipulation, most of the time, it is all about power. The main problem is the mental violence is not violent enough. That may be because these are true events with real-life historical figures. You end up with a dramatic replay of historical events. There is no prominent theme underneath that does not say anything about life that you can take away from.

Is it worth seeing for the performances? Not really. It would also require an interest in the foundations of psychoanalysis (which I do have an interest in) as well. But even with that, that’s still pushing it because there is nothing more beneath it’s surface to offer. In the end, I’m glad I saw it but A Dangerous Method is a bit unremarkable.

Goon by Michael Dowse

Goon by Michael Dowse

My friend and I used to have this one joke about how “jerseying” someone is the only Canadian martial art. For the layman, I will proceed to explain what “jerseying” is. To jersey someone is to grab the back of someone’s shirt and pull it over their arms into a knot, which immobilizes them, which frees you up to punch them. If you’re good enough, you can elbow and knee them as well! And it’s fun to watch how helpless they are when they can’t swing their arms while being pummeled.

Yes… that is funny to me. That is the tone of Goon.

Under the right context, it’s very funny to watch somebody being punched. Goon provides this context with a story with heart and a very likable central underdog character. Doug Glatt (played by Seann William Scott) is ostracized from his family, his father and older brother (played by Eugene Levy and David Paetkau) are doctors and he works as a bouncer at his local bar. He is aware he is not smart and there seems to be nothing else for him. But he’s good at one thing: beating the shit out of people. Everybody looks down and picks on him (even when his golden opportunity to play for the local hockey team). When Doug beats the shit out of them, you’re with him and it makes it okay to laugh at the brutal injuries he inflicts on his tormentors.

I’m a Seann William Scott fan, he’s a good comedic actor with a firm grasp for comedic rhythm. He’s played zany, nerdy, and obnoxious. In Goon, it’s different, he plays a straight man and is reacting to the ridiculousness around him. It’s a different comedic dynamic as you’re laughing at a character for not knowing the world better and more often you are touched by his purity (as he romances Eva, played by Alison pill) than him directly doing anything that is quote unquote funny.

The fights are pretty violent. It’s fun watching how these hockey fights build up in the game because there’s almost never a real reason for it. Why do the referees stand there and watch them fight? Why aren’t they permanently suspended from the game? It is a pure instinctual reaction physicalized and that’s what’s fun and funny about it.

There are no cheap gags, in fact there are serious moments in the film where there are no jokes and I appreciated that. Liev Schreiber’s handlebar moustache was very funny, and Liev Schreiber was too. But it’s mostly the handlebar moustache.

I’m a bad Canadian, I don’t watch hockey. However, I throughly enjoyed the hell out of Goon. I laughed pretty hard.