Man of Tai Chi by Keanu Reeves

Man of Tai Chi by Keanu Reeves

Man of Tai Chi by Keanu Reeves

A young martial artist’s unparalleled Tai Chi skills land him in a highly lucrative underworld fight club.

Man of Tai Chi tells the age-old martial arts tale of a student devoting himself to an art, he gets too extreme, loses his way and has to find himself again.  It’s simple, well-paced, and communicates martial arts philosophy.

Tiger Chen holds his own as the breakout martial arts lead. His Tai Chi movements are beautiful. The core of his charisma is that he is a real human being with vulnerabilities. He is not preening for the camera in a showy or narcissistic manner (ahem Andy On, Wu Jing…) and plays his scenes earnestly.  Does Tiger Chen fit the description of a leading man? I don’t know, but it’d be nice to see more of him in future roles.

As for the supporting cast, Karen Mok fares better when she’s required to be loud and peppy. Silent performances aren’t her forte. Simon Yam is collecting a cheque and there’s nothing wrong with that. Qing Ye makes an adorable love interest. Iko Uwais from The Raid: Redemption (my review here) makes a nice cameo as a fighter. Yu Hai is charismatic as Tiger’s Tai Chi master, the dramatic scenes between Tiger and him were engaging and form the heart of the story.

The comedy gags in Cantonese spoken by the Hong Kong policemen actually do work. I laughed, though I worry how the gags will play as subtitles for English-speaking audiences. It’s like Reeves found a way to seep into the culture. That’s a thing that really impressed me with Man of Tai Chifor a film set in China that’s directed by a foreign director, it remains true to the culture. There’s no Orientalist gaze on Chinese culture, or a laundry-list showcase of the tourist hotspots. Mainlanders speak Mandarin, and people in Hong Kong speak Cantonese. There’s no misrepresentation here. I love how the film shows that many Chinese people are bilingual these days.

Tai Chi is a difficult martial art to capture on film. The idea of countering a hard energy with a soft energy is something you can only feel when you’re practicing the martial art, it’s a hard thing to see and be a part of as a bystander. It’s difficult to locate where the skill of the fight is. Previous cinematic attempts at Tai Chi, such as Jet Li’s The Tai Chi Master or Yuen Wah in Stephen Chow’s Kung Fu Hustle, have solved this problem by exaggerating Tai Chi to a cartoonish degree. Yuen Woo Ping executes this wonderfully and finds the right assortment of other martial art styles to fully test the limits of Tai Chi. Tiger Chen fights his opponents in the air, rolls on the ground, uses objects and the surrounding environment. There are no quick cuts hiding pulled punches and I love that. The fights are covered in wide shots with real martial artists and anybody can follow whats going on.

Contrary to popular belief, I sincerely do not think Keanu Reeves is a bad actor. I’m a fan. There’s a great article online by Kate Ronnebolm called Keanu Reeves is a Queer Superhero that aptly analyzes his success as a movie star. It says the reason Reeves has lasted this long is because he possesses a pensive quality, like he’s constantly reflecting upon himself and his surroundings. This has served his roles in ConstantineA Scanner Darkly, and Neo from The Matrix. I agree with this point, Reeves owns pensive. I think his performances have varied depending on the director’s ability to capture that quality on camera.

That all said, unfortunately Reeves is the own worst part of his own movie. I take no issue with his performance in Man of Tai Chi, but casting himself as the main villain meant that he is the final boss of his own kung fu movie. After 90 minutes of seeing Tiger Chen beating numerous opponents of varying styles, there simply is no way I can believe that Keanu can beat Tiger Chen. The film doesn’t provide any assistance as there’s no establishing scene showcasing Keanu’s character’s fighting abilities early in the story. For example, the final henchman that fights Tony Jaa in Ong Bak is obviously physically inferior to Jaa in real life, but the story makes him the more superior fighter by stating it beforehand. I would have been fine with even that. The end climatic fight is stiff and awkward; it’s obvious that Keanu didn’t have time to train with his directing duties.

That said, there is still a lot to like. And perhaps I like Man of Tai Chi more for intellectual reasons rather than its final result. But I have seen too many recent Chinese martial arts films that don’t star martial artists in them, but rather pretty boy actors just dancing around trying to look good in their own money-making vehicles. That’s just boring to me. I would rather see a film that’s trying something ambitious and fall short than make something that’s vacuous and faceless. Even with a disappointing climatic fight, the heartbeat of Man of Tai Chi is what won me over. I don’t’ know if Keanu Reeves want to keep directing in the future, but this is a good debut film.

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Flying Swords of Dragon Gate by Tsui Hark

Tsui Hark is always hit-and-miss with me. My favorite Tsui Hark films are Once Upon a Time in China 2 (the epic face off between Jet Li and Donnie Yen), Time and Tide (some insane action scenes) and Double Team. Yes, I said it. I love Double Team. It’s insane, crazy kitschy fun. Seriously, who could have thought the idea of casting Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dennis Rodman and Mickey Rourke in a coloful action movie?

I saw this film back in December. I haven’t seen any incarnations of the Dragon Gate Inn films. I was aware it was a remake or re-imagining of the story and that it was going to be in 3D. I viewed in this interest of seeing where Chinese special effects have gone and what Tsui Hark would do with such a huge production.

Tsui Hark is an imaginative filmmaker but often is undisciplined. He’ll imagine fascinating places and sets up great set pieces but he often wants to do too much. It all ends up creating thrilling sensations in parts than telling a story from beginning to finish as a whole. The worst example being The Legend of Zu, where the visuals and the world was interesting, there was nothing remotely emotional for me to hold on to. Eventually, it goes so long, I just tired out and tap out. As a side note, I thought it was very smart to have him helm the first third of Triangle (the three’s collaboration between him, Ringo Lam and Johnnie To).

I’m sad to say, Flying Swords of Dragon Gate is Tsui Hark going way too far with his imagination again. There is no story or much character to speak of. Jet Li is here to fight, he does not get a full character at all. Zhou Xun is a charming solid actress but she does not have much to do here. She breathes humanity into the story every time she’s present but there’s not enough of her or humanity. There’s a gag with Aloys Chen Kun playing two roles (as both the villain and a lovable oaf) that goes on way too long. Shake this film and half an hour would have fallen off. I am not a punitive or bitter person, but let’s call a spade a spade.

The 3D looked awful. The CG was very fake at times. I’m never one to niptick special effects but I would have forgiven it if there was something else there to distract me. It was very forgettable. I honestly cannot recall a particular scene or sequence worth mentioning.

The Mainland Chinese film market is on the rise. There’s a lot of money being thrown around to played with. I just think it should be executed with some discipline, like in Bodyguards and Assassins in where the epic scale of production was used to enhance a story.

Seriously, I would have wanted to see Double Team re-released in 3D. Or heck, give me Time and Tide 2 in 3D. Now that would be something!

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